A Failure to Communicate? Definitely!

This ought to be fun!  Just can’t wait to see what the Soros lackey is going to tell us about the youth of today and same-sex attraction.  Anyone know if he actually knows any youth?  Just curious. BTW, he’s been a bit of a player for quite a while now. Here’s a little background.

A Failure to Communicate

The Synod’s Mistake on LGBT Catholics

By John Gehring

November 2, 2018

And this title might be the only place where any agreement between me and John Gehring might lie.  Of course, his definition of “mistake” and mine would differ greatly.

The recently concluded Synod on Young People reflected Pope Francis’s call for a listening church that accompanies people and discerns together. Unlike synods in previous papacies, where a final script was essentially drafted in advance and most bishops dutifully signed off, a more authentic process unfolded during the month-long gathering that ended last Sunday.

Wait!  What?  Seems like that’s more or less exactly what happened, albeit minus the “LGBT” acronym, because they knew there was no way in hell they were going to get that in.

A mode of engagement that prioritizes a humble posture of encounter is essential if the Catholic Church hopes to stem the tide of young people leaving an institution they often view as irrelevant, hypocritical, and aloof. In fact, those who are raised Catholic are more likely than those raised in any other religion to cite negative religious treatment of gay and lesbian people as the primary reason they leave, according to the Public Religion Research Institute.”

Huh??? The Public Religion Research Institute?  Oh my.  Hysterical.  I mean, John, why didn’t you just put out your own poll asking people who agree with you what they think?  People, do the research.  https://catholicvote.org/public-religion-research-institute-misleads-on-catholic-attitudes/

Can I tell you why people leave the Church?  It’s simple:  It’s HARD to be Catholic!!!  It’s hard to pick up a cross.  Our catechesis has been largely abysmal for many years now, and we’re not getting the message across in most of our churches of the benefits of carrying that cross.  Duh! Everlasting life, and the spiritual world in general, have been reduced to a fable. It’s no wonder people are being sucked into the secular world. They’re offering more.  We’re just given homilies on how to be nice.  Well, not at my parish, but that’s why I go there.  They’re actually offering me something I need and want.  Oh, and we do pretty well.

“We’ve gone from talking about young people and from talking to young people to talking with them,” said Cardinal Vincent Nichols of Westminster, president of the Catholic Bishops Conference of England and Wales.

I am absolutely not against talking with young people.  I do it as often as I possibly can.  Whether or not they agree with me, they know that I have their best interest in mind AND I will tell them as much of the truth as I can. 

A hopeful church that listens from below and engages in dialogue is better positioned than a fearful, fortress church to fulfill the Second Vatican Council’s proclamation to read the “signs of the times.” For young gay Catholics and their allies, the synod offered a space where bishops could learn from the joys and hopes, the griefs and anxieties, of the LGBT faithful. Signs pointed to a potentially important step forward. In a document prepared before the synod, the Vatican used the term “LGBT” for the first time. “Some LGBT youth,” it read, want to “benefit from greater closeness and experience greater care from the church.” Not exactly a revolutionary statement, and rather painfully obvious. But the use of “LGBT” was striking and significant. The church has a major language problem when it comes to respecting the dignity of gay, lesbian, and transgender people. Catholic teaching documents typically use “homosexual” or refer to “homosexual tendencies.” Using the LGBT descriptor—often preferred by many gay, lesbian, and transgender people—is a sign of respect.

Whoa! Whoa! Whoa, son!  Heck of a parsing of Gaudium et Spes.  Nice try, though.

4. To carry out such a task, the Church has always had the duty of scrutinizing the signs of the times and of interpreting them in the light of the Gospel. Thus, in language intelligible to each generation, she can respond to the perennial questions which men ask about this present life and the life to come, and about the relationship of the one to the other. We must therefore recognize and understand the world in which we live, its explanations, its longings, and its often dramatic characteristics. Some of the main features of the modern world can be sketched as follows.

Thanks for channeling Fr. Martin, but no thanks. We need to scrutinize the signs of the times, not just roll over for them.  Gaudium et Spes shows us that these are all perennial questions.  This isn’t some knew ideology.  In fact, it’s all been repeated time and again, and as usual, Truth and her answers do not change.

Archbishop Chaput very eloquently pointed out:

What the Church “holds to be true about human sexuality is not a stumbling block.”

“It is the only real path to joy and wholeness,” he continued. “There is no such thing as an ‘LGBTQ Catholic’ or a ‘transgender Catholic’ or a ‘heterosexual Catholic,’ as if our sexual appetites defined who we are; as if these designations described discrete communities of differing but equal integrity within the real ecclesial community, the body of Jesus Christ.”

This is Truth.  This is dignity. This is respect. Describing people by their sexual appetite is lowering them to a creature who’s being is controlled by a sexual appetite. We are not. We have free will. 

But the final report from the synod did not use the term “LGBT.” Several bishops, including Philadelphia Archbishop Charles Chaput, criticized its potential appearance. For the church, he said, “there is no such thing as an ‘LGBTQ Catholic’ or a ‘transgender Catholic’ or a ‘heterosexual Catholic,’ as if our sexual appetites defined who we are.”

Can I get an AMEN?  Seriously.  If our sexual appetites define us, we are in big trouble.  In fact, this is kind of what’s been happening with this abuse scandal.  People give in to the notion that that’s how they are made and there’s nothing we can do about it, so we should be free to act on it. It seems to be just peachy for those who want to act on their homosexual appetite, but should it be with children or someone who doesn’t desire it, it’s evil.  Nope.  Both evil.

Some bishops and other church leaders foster a toxic culture that scapegoats and demonizes LGBT laity and clergy

Head in the sand time again.  How about we state this little fact:  80% of these abuse cases (and with the latest round, probably more) have been perpetrated by homosexual priests.  So, I think it’s safe to say that they seem to be the ones who readily give into their weaknesses. Can we at least agree on that? 

This observation reflects, perhaps unwittingly, a certain theological arrogance.

Or maybe your lack of acceptance of the facts reflects a bit of narcissism instead?

Saying there are “no LGBT Catholics,” when many Catholics who love and contribute to the church embrace that description, is disrespectful at best, and at worst denies a person dignity. Chaput warns of “sexual appetites” defining who we are—a reasonable caution—but it seems that the archbishop is the one who is reducing being gay, lesbian, or transgender to sexual mechanics, as if our friends, neighbors, and family members are little more than a bundle of physical urges rather than complex and multidimensional human beings. I understand the instinct not to balkanize the church into islands of identity. We are “one, holy, catholic and apostolic church,” in the words of the Nicene Creed. Our shared faith unifies.

Hey, man, the Church is made of sinners, but dignity isn’t brought about by what we want to be called. Dignity is given to us by God in our creation.  Are you saying someone who proudly states “I am a porn star” is somehow brought dignity by that label? How about those who want to be labeled a satanic high priest?  I mean, you can’t deny that there are plenty of people like that, yet somehow we’re just supposed to say, “Oh, that’s what you want to be classified as? Awesome!” Please.  This is just your pet proclivity, so you are going to demand we all say, “Oh, OK, whatever you want,” as if that somehow imparts dignity to a person.

But the church does recognize and often names those who reflect our diversity. Some dioceses have offices, retreats, or specific events for Latino Catholics, African-American Catholics, young-adult Catholics, and senior Catholics. None of this is reductionist. There is a proud tradition of celebrating Irish-American and Italian-American Catholics’ contributions to the church, distinct cultures that are nonetheless part of the beautiful mosaic of Catholicism. In the same way a Latina Catholic doesn’t exclusively define herself by being a Latina, identifying as an LGBT Catholic doesn’t circumscribe one’s identity, but acknowledges its significance as part of the whole.

And as Archbishop Chaput points out, we’re don’t call ourselves heterosexual Catholics.  For goodness sake.  Get a wee bit of grasp on reality and stop comparing apples to Toyotas. This is a ridiculous comparison.  If someone wants to say they are a cat, are you just fine with that?  I mean, I’m sure they feel that this is their special diversity.  You can’t have it both ways, John.

For Archbishop Chaput, the church should not use LGBT because it is wrong to, in his words, “categorize people.” This is a laudatory concept, until you reflect on the irony of that statement coming from a leader in a church that uses language often viewed as clinical and demeaning by the very people it seeks to describe. Homosexual “inclinations” and “intrinsically disordered,” words used in official church teaching, also categorize people, and in ways that exclude and wound.

Nice try again.  He actually said:

“It follows that ‘LGBTQ’ and similar language should not be used in Church documents, because using it suggests that these are real, autonomous groups, and the Church simply doesn’t categorize people that way.”

Your beef seems to be with Archbishop Chaput, but he’s showing YOU what the Church has never done. Heaven forbid a member of the Church would reflect what the Church actually does and does not say. I mean, hello, “inclinations” and “intrinsically disordered” is found in Church teaching, so you getting mad at Archbishop Chaput is just targeting those who hold to those teachings, including many people suffering from same-sex attraction.  Seriously, you act as if everyone with same-sex attraction has hurt feelings about this.  Sorry.  It ain’t so. 

San Diego Bishop Robert McElroy has suggested the church needs to rethink such language. In an interview with America magazine, he said the description “intrinsically disordered” is “very destructive language that I think we should not use pastorally.” He added that “in Catholic moral theology, it is a philosophical term that is automatically misunderstood in our society as a psychological judgment.” The church can’t be a “field hospital” for the wounded, to use a central metaphor from Pope Francis, if its own language wounds.

And yet, many people suffering with same-sex attraction don’t feel the martyrdom you are trying to imply on their behalf.  What about them?  Oh, a wee bit of an inconvenient truth that more and more people who consider themselves same-sex attracted aren’t going to be riding in your parade?  They, like the saints, embrace Church teaching and are willing to take up their crosses. And you know what?  We’re going to be right there with them struggling with our own crosses. 

The synod’s final report included some positive things: reiterating the church’s condemnation of any violence directed at sexual minorities; acknowledging that ministry to gay and lesbian people is already being done in the church; and emphasizing accompaniment. Perhaps presaging a future and much-needed discussion on the broader dimensions of how the church addresses human sexuality, the report noted that “there are questions related to the body, to affectivity and to sexuality that require a deeper anthropological, theological, and pastoral exploration.” This is significant, and it rattles conservative bishops. “The Catholic hierarchy is acknowledging that the church needs to update its understanding of the science of sex and gender, and that also means updating the church’s theology on sexuality and its ministry to gay people,” David Gibson wrote in an analysis for Religion News Service.

The fact that you think that the Church’s teaching on sexuality needs to be updated and is somehow outdated is rattling to any faithful Catholic.  There’s so much beauty and richness that you cannot seem to grasp. Can you say “Theology of the Body?”  I know it can’t be grasped in a day but give it just a little read before you bother to comment.

Archbishop Chaput characterized that line in the final report as “subtle and concerning.” The church “already has a clear, rich, and articulate Christian anthropology,” he told the National Catholic Register. “It’s unhelpful to create doubt or ambiguity around issues of human identity, purpose, and sexuality, unless one is setting the stage to change what the church believes and teaches about all three, starting with sexuality.”

BOOM!  Just because John Gehring and buddies missed it doesn’t mean that it is there.

Whatever discussions may yet take place in the church, an editorial in The Tablet underscored a painful truth. “Few progressive Catholics would have dared to dream that Synod might open a conversation about ‘intrinsic disorder,’ or that it might acknowledge that even the acronym LGBT excludes queer, intersex, and asexual Catholics,” the editors wrote. “What is, perhaps, most heartbreaking is that LGBT Catholics pinned their hopes on so little: being discussed in a language that wasn’t overtly offensive, with words that will—for many gay people—trigger memories of bullying and harassment.”

Dear progressive Catholics, you want to have a conversation about “intrinsic disorder” or anything else, I’d be happy.  Just drop me a line.  I’m not being sarcastic here.  For some reason John Gehring thinks we are unwilling to talk to you, or at least that’s what he’d like you to believe.  I am totally willing to talk and to struggle with you as you carry your cross, and I hope you help me to carry mine.  Our struggles are all different, but we all need the Body of Christ to make it through this life and gain everlasting life. 

Several U.S. bishops, including Chicago Cardinal Blase Cupich, have articulated a strong message of solidarity with LGBT Catholics. Putting this accompaniment into practice will require calling out organizations such as Church Militant, a group that bullies, threatens, and demeans LGBT Catholics and their allies. A few weeks ago a pastoral associate at a San Diego parish submitted his resignation after he “endured physical and emotional violence from groups like Church Militant and LifeSiteNews for the past year and a half,” according to an email he sent to friends and associates obtained by the National Catholic Reporter. The harassment included slashed tires, death threats, attacks outside Mass, and “hundreds of letters, phone calls, and emails.”

I’ve already addressed Aaron Bianco here, so I’m not going to go there again, but if you missed it, here’s my response to this flap: 

Of course the Catholic Church doesn’t condone this abuse; in fact, the Catechism explicitly denounces it. Nevertheless, some bishops and other church leaders foster a toxic culture that scapegoats and demonizes LGBT laity and clergy. Former Vatican ambassador Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, who has called for Pope Francis’s resignation, warns of “homosexual networks” with the “power of octopus tentacles” that are “strangling” the church. “It is time to admit that there is a homosexual subculture within the hierarchy of the Catholic Church that is wreaking great devastation in the vineyard of the Lord,” Bishop Robert Morlino of Madison, Wisconsin, wrote in a letter to Catholics in his diocese. Such language only tills the soil for potentially violent acts.

Seriously, can’t we talk about sin without having it be a threat somehow? Sorry, again, my kids have to live in this world, John.  You don’t get to play the martyr card.

As James Baldwin wrote: “It is a terrible, an inexorable law that one cannot deny the humanity of another without diminishing one’s own.” When the church continues to deny LGBT people their full humanity, isn’t that the risk it takes?”

Oh, yes.  James Baldwin who knows all the beauty and intricacies of the Catholic Church.  Geez.  You had the chance somewhere to quote St. John Paul II, but you went with James Baldwin as your “saint” of choice?!?

And, just for the record, the Church wants nothing less than dignity and salvation for all Her children.  The Church NEVER discriminates amongst God’s children.  The same rules apply to all of us.  It ain’t easy.  There’s a lot about the narrow gate but the Body of Christ is meant to struggle together.

The Blame Game

Alright, children! I’m not sure where I’ve been linked from, but I’ve gotten a couple of love letters today from people who do not think quite as I do. For everyone’s amusement, I will post them and my response to them.

Aaron Bianco was cited by the DA for saving the life of a priest and a housekeeper at his parish. Aaron risked his own life at the hands of a deranged and violent men hellbent on murdering a priest any priest.

https://youtu.be/LWxciq2xrrQ (Not going to bother embedding this one.  I have already posted on Twitter.)

Because of people like you, he’s had his life and the lives of his familly (sic) threatened by Catholics and his church set on fire.

You should be ashamed of yourself.

 

Then, I got an email. Not sure if it’s the same person or not:

This is the man you attacked, Aaron Bianco. He saved the lives of the priest and the housekeeper at his church.

Because of death threats against his family and an arson attack on his church, he has resigned.

https://fox5sandiego.com/2018/10/21/gay-pastoral-associate-says-farewell-at-local-church-resigns-after-harassment/

You are in part responsible for this.

And here is MY reply to both:

If you followed me on Facebook and Twitter, you’d know that I have NEVER suggested anyone harm Aaron Bianco. In fact, I condemn linking to his publicly listed address, because it serves no purpose when we already have him on video talking about his “husband” (I’ve already seen the video on his award and posted it, in fact.)

Just because someone stops a crime doesn’t mean that they should be working in a Catholic Church when they contradict Church teachings. I THINK that this would be a no-brainer for anyone, but this has always been the issue.

And, before you throw stones, you might just want to know who committed the crime. The fact that supposedly so many crimes have been committed and they still have no suspects is, well, suspect. The fact that the graffiti was on the inside of the parish buildings and no cameras on site caught the culprit is also suspect.

You might want to realize that some of us take sin pretty darn seriously. No, we’re not wishing ill to people who disagree with us or harm the Church, but we most certainly don’t want them in a position to do so, in which Mr. Bianco was.

So, while I may be ashamed of myself for many reasons, it ain’t this. BTW, this is the one and only blog post I’ve ever made about Aaron Bianco. Please note, I did not wish him any harm in it: https://onemadmomblog.wordpress.com/2016/12/13/a-funny-thing-happened-on-the-way-to-the-internal-forum/  This would be akin to say any misfortune that might befall me at the hand of some nutwing is YOUR fault. Ridiculous.

And, BTW, I have same-sex attracted family and friends. If you think for a moment I wish them harm, either, you’d be a fool.

So, let me expound upon this exchange a little further, and then I can just shoot this blog post at anyone else who tries to accuse me of anything again. Since Fr. Martin has been ranting about this, I’ll shoot it at him. (Breathe!  That’s not a threat of violence to Fr. Martin!)

First, I’m assuming I’m not the only one who has same-sex attracted friends and family members. I’m assuming many more also have same-sex attracted co-workers. Get a clue, people. This isn’t about hate at all. This has always been about whether or not it’s proper for someone so outwardly opposed (not privately) to Church teachings to be in a “ministerial” position. I would think it’s common sense to even non-Catholics that people opposed to your mission should not be in these jobs. That said, common sense has left the building along with Elvis, so here it is for you. You don’t get to work for Coke and sell Pepsi.  Duh, duh, duh. 

I don’t hate anyone same-sex attracted, transgender, or whatever. However, I will not sit quietly in a corner while they spew an agenda which I think not only harmful to them but to the world. You can heap all the “hate, judgmental, intolerant” rhetoric at me, but it’s not going to change that fact. I love them all well enough to stand my ground so they don’t end dead via disease or suicide. You might think that’s hateful, but who’s really the hater here? If I simply wanted them gone, I’d let them continue on.

And let’s go back to the fact that I do have friends and family members suffering from same-sex attraction. Oh, and I’m a mom. I tend to see everyone else’s kid as my own. I can’t help it. My husband will vouch for the fact I’ve literally cried at the fact I knew some 20-something, thousands of miles away, who I’d never even met in person, was spending a holiday alone because he was a foster kid growing up. And Milo Yiannopoulos? I pray for him whenever I think about him. I’d like to adopt them all. So, no, just like many other Catholics opposed to Aaron Bianco working at St. John the Evangelist, we don’t hate him or wish him harm. You don’t get to play that card. In fact, I’m sad some priests and bishops in the diocese of San Diego are quite content to let Aaron continue on with his sin without a peep because, what? They want to be considered cool in the LGBT community? Never mind the disease or hell thing. They are totally willing to throw our SSA friends and family under the bus. I love Aaron enough to say, “Struggle along with the rest of us!”

I’m not going to back down from saying this because someone may be being mean to Aaron Bianco. Aaron appears to be a vindictive person. Why don’t you ask him what happened to the Legion of Mary group when he took over? Or how about the little old people who said the Rosary before daily Mass? By the way, kudos to you people for keeping up the daily Rosary before Mass even when you had to say it on the church steps. Glad you got that privilege back. It’s the lowest of the low to tell ANYONE, much less the usual daily Mass-going crowd, that they shouldn’t say the Rosary or that they have to stay out of the church until minutes before Mass starts. So there. He’s not the choirboy everyone likes to make of him. Deal.

I have written before about Aaron Bianco in the context of Bishop McElroy’s debacle of an appointment to the Diocese of San Diego as linked to above. Boo hoo! If you want to try to say articles like this caused Aaron’s troubles, then any ill that befalls me must be because the people who sent me notes this morning don’t like my commentary. See the lack of logic?  People that do evil and call for evil are responsible. So far I haven’t seen that happen to Aaron Bianco.  Somebody has simply figured they are going to act badly.

How about we blame the people who let someone opposed to Church teaching be in any position of power in a diocesan Church? Bravo, Bishop McElroy. You’ve got your martyr to who you can play savior. Nobody would be writing articles if that had not happened.  Point the finger at those who are really being divisive, not us who love the teachings of the Church.

Let’s talk about Aaron’s address being published, I would have never done this. I mean, you’ve already supposedly got some nutwing vandalizing the church at which he works.  I understand the Lepanto Institute was trying to provide as much evidence to Aaron Bianco’s “marriage” but, duh.  It’s tantamount to Catholic doxing. Yes, yes. It was info in the public domain so technically not doxing, but we already have him on tape talking about his “husband.” What more did they need? It was unnecessary to the story, and, quite frankly, just allows the victim card to be played. Very bad strategy.  The evidence of outside of the Church “marriage” was already proven.

As far as the vandalism and threats go, INVESTIGATE! I think we’re going to find it’s some sort of deranged person like the guy who came into the church and threatened the staff.  It’s not like crazy hasn’t visited the parish before. I mean, is the guy who held Aaron at scissor-point out yet? Does he have relatives?  Might be a place to start. Last time I checked, we weren’t being blamed for that one.

I know the faithful down in the San Diego Diocese want it investigated.  I’ve corresponded with them. I think they know they will be vindicated should the perpetrator be found. Until that happens, though, people, including the people writing me, might want to stop throwing around accusations without proof. For all they know, it’s just a person trying to create a martyr for their cause. It’s not like that hasn’t happened before time and again. I will say that the first person calling for an investigation to be dropped usually has something to fear. I do not. Bring. It. On. People shouldn’t be able to get away with threatening or vandalizing anyone. Personally, I find it really strange that it’s supposedly been going on so long and nobody’s been caught yet. I also find it strange that it wasn’t only vandalism, it was breaking and entering. Not usual for these types of situations. I mean, geez, is San Diego running around with criminal masterminds?  Cameras exist for a reason.  Maybe get a few more? See what the neighbors’ cameras show?

Finally, remember that the people who you are accusing are practicing Catholics. We believe that sin kills the soul. You’ll probably find us in confession on a regular basis, but we’re going to threaten and vandalize or incite people to do so? Right. Sounds like my usual hobby. Sorry, revenge ain’t our thing. Stop using the blame game to try to silence us.