Screed of the Week

<Sarcasm>Gee, what a surprise</Sarcasm> (seriously, they really need a sarcasm font), the Pope visits America, and the liberal media is in overdrive trying to show how much Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone and Pope Francis differ. I’m not really sure what the fixation is as of late, though. I really thought these last few weeks would have been all about Archbishop Chaput, since he was the one in charge of the World Meeting of Families. Instinctively, you would think that he would be the person to go after, but for some reason, there’s still a huge obsession with Archbishop Cordileone. I think this shows just how important he is to the Catholic landscape in America. The latest diatribe against Archbishop Cordileone comes courtesy of the San Francisco “Comicle” (http://bit.ly/2bNomwh):

S.F. archbishop quiet on pope’s pet issue: income inequality

By Joe Garofoli

San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone waits to process…

San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone isn’t shy about taking bold public stances on national issues like same-sex marriage. But he’s been reticent to use his bully pulpit to speak as loudly about income inequality, the most pressing concern in San Francisco — and Pope Francis’ pet issue.

Maybe I’m crazy, but I don’t remember any bishop, archbishop, or cardinal speaking about every hot-button topic on the same day, or even in the same year! What is Joe Garofoli’s proof that the archbishop is reticent? Zero, as usual. Proof really isn’t necessary for liberals, though. Do you think Joe bothered to ask for an interview or a statement before penning this piece?

Francis is using his six-day tour of the U.S. to urge clergy to advocate on behalf of the poor. In a speech to 300 American bishops this week in Washington, the pope told Catholic leaders to “face the challenging issues of our time.” In the first-ever papal address to a joint meeting of Congress on Thursday, Francis lauded Dorothy Day, an American who founded the Catholic Worker Movement, for her standing up for the poor.

“Her social activism, her passion for justice and for the cause of the oppressed, were inspired by the Gospel, her faith, and the example of the saints,” Francis said. Cordileone has spoken forcefully about other social ills, but some of the region’s leading politicians say Cordileone hasn’t been involved with their efforts to tackle the area’s affordability crisis.

The statewide Catholic Conference of Bishops supported state Sen. Mark Leno’s failed attempt to raise California’s minimum wage to $11 an hour in 2016. Leno, D-San Francisco, wished Cordileone would have raised his voice on an issue so pressing to many in his diocese, which includes San Francisco, Marin and San Mateo counties.

“We needed every strong voice on that,” Leno said.

I don’t remember the city holding a restorative justice conference (http://www.reentryaction.org/conference). Using Leno’s logic, does that mean they don’t care about it? Are they reticent to use their “bully pulpit” on that issue? Hmmmmmm?????

Cordileone has not worked directly with Mayor Ed Lee’s office on affordability issues, though the city’s Interfaith Council, which includes Catholic congregations, has.

I don’t remember the Pope working directly with Ed Lee’s office either. Doesn’t mean he doesn’t support the issue. I’m reasonably sure Ed Lee’s office has spent more time hassling the Archbishop than asking for his help.  Personally, I think far more would get done in San Francisco without Ed Lee’s involvement.

In March, the archdiocese became the subject of national ridicule when sprinklers at St. Mary’s Cathedral were turned on homeless people sleeping in its doorways.

National ridicule? Yeah, that was on everyone’s lips. Puh-lease! Has the city of San Francisco suffered public ridicule for its power washing of the homeless Monday through Friday on Market Street? (Let’s hope that has been paused for the drought, or maybe  just because it’s evil!) This is a severe over-dramatization. The reality is that one side of the Cathedral (the not very trafficked side of the Cathedral where people do drugs and defecate) was sprinkled to keep that from happening. Meanwhile, the WHOLE rest of the property was free and clear to the homeless.

‘Wedge issues’

“You have an archbishop who is on a different page from the pope when it comes to” income inequality, said Supervisor David Campos, who proposed a moratorium on market rate housing development in the Mission District. “I haven’t heard him talk about it at all. Instead, his focus has been on wedge issues, like same-sex marriage.”

Hey, David Campos, have you actually talked to the Archbishop on income inequality, or could it be that you are just speculating? Nah, couldn’t possibly be that (Dang! Where’s that sarcasm font again?)! I’m pretty sure you don’t know what page he’s on.  Let me explain this to you, Mr. Campos: the Archbishop speaks on many Catholic issues, including marriage, morality, sin, etc., whether or not they are popular.

“San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone waits to process…

Cordileone became a national figure by speaking out against same-sex marriage. He helped raise $1.5 million to put Proposition 8 on the 2008 state ballot and then rallied evangelical Christians and Mormons to help pass the measure that banned same-sex marriage in California. He referred to gay nuptials as “the ultimate attack of the Evil One,” and has emerged as the point man in national demonstrations against same-sex marriage through the powerful U.S. Conference of Bishops, on which he chairs the Subcommittee for the Promotion and Defense of Marriage.

What??? I have never heard of this (except for 1,000 other articles). New material, people! Can you PLEASE write about something new and earth shattering, for once? I mean, really! Who in this country (and beyond) has not heard this before?

Though Francis has not changed church policy on same-sex marriage, he has focused much of his attention elsewhere. On other issues, Cordileone has joined him.

Well, nice of you to acknowledge that Pope Francis has not changed Church doctrine. That said, you blew it with the term “policy”.  It’s not a policy, it’s a truth which cannot change.  There’s no need for the Holy Father to focus on Church teaching that cannot and will not change every time he speaks. He speaks to the universal Church. We already know this. The bishops in the United States? They have an obligation to make the teaching on marriage known to all under their care, Catholics and non-Catholics alike, especially when people are being persecuted for their belief on marriage right in their dioceses. Of course, Archbishop Cordileone has joined the Pope on the Church’s teaching on marriage, as well as many other issues. In fact, can you name one issue on which they have differed? Anyone? Again, do I expect Archbishop Cordileone to mention every single doctrine and social teaching of the Catholic Church in the next day, week, year, decade? Nope. Let’s flip this around on San Francisco’s self-important politicians. Do they address all the social ills of the City all the time? Nope, not even close.

From his perch as leader of the 560,000-member Archdiocese of San Francisco, Cordileone has also spoken out on immigration. About 46 percent of the diocese’s members are Latino, including many new immigrants.

Perch? Can you be more snide, Joe?

In July, he wrote a letter to both the Senate and House Judiciary committees when they were holding hearings on immigration. Amid national debate ignited by the San Francisco slaying of Kathryn Steinle, allegedly by an immigrant facing deportation, Cordileone urged lawmakers not to use the crime to scapegoat all immigrants.

“It is also important that we recognize that the vast majority of immigrants — both those with and without papers — are not a violent threat to society and so should not be subject to guilt by association,” Cordileone wrote. “In fact, statistics show that immigrant communities are by and large safe and that a cooperative relationship between law enforcement and those communities enhances public safety and reduces crime.”

He’s called for immigration reform and supports the left-leaning preference for a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants in the U.S. illegally.

You’d think they Chronicle might be singing his praises on this one just a little more, but no. They want to browbeat him into accepting their complete social doctrine, not just the ones that are in keeping with the Catholic Church. Thou shalt not deviate from the teachings of the San Francisco social scene!

Cordileone’s supporters say the archbishop cares deeply about the region’s housing and affordability crisis, particularly as it affects low-income people and immigrants. But, they say, he has chosen to do his work behind the scenes.

Focus on social concerns

Two years ago, Cordileone created an Office of Public Policy and Social Concerns and tapped Auxiliary Bishop William Justice as the diocese’s point person for income inequality. That group has spent the past months organizing at the parish level, especially on immigration and eviction issues, said Lorena Melgarejo, coordinator of Parish Organizing.

The group has trained thousands of local parishioners on how to advocate for themselves and others on housing rights, Melgarejo said. It has organized monthly immigration rights Masses in the Mission, where legal advocates work with parishioners after the service, and held demonstrations at Immigration and Customs Enforcement offices and on behalf of parishioners who have been evicted.

Cordileone’s backers also point to the efforts of organizations like Catholic Charities, which work to aid the poor.

Jennifer Martinez, executive director of the San Francisco Organizing Project, which has advocated on immigration and housing issues for three decades, said even though Cordileone hasn’t been on the street himself, “the archbishop has been very supportive of our work to make sure that people have a safe and stable home.”

“The archbishop is leading this work — it’s not his words, it’s his actions,” said Melgarejo, who aside from her work at the diocese has been a longtime labor activist in San Francisco. “It goes beyond the homilies and the preaching and the church. It’s about how do we walk our faith outside of the church walls.”

What the what? We’re at the end of the article and we see this now? Maybe they don’t think anyone reads the end of their articles?

So why isn’t the archbishop talking about income inequality, a topic few dispute in San Francisco, with the same vigor with which he rails on same-sex marriage, an attitude that won’t win many converts in San Francisco?

It might be because you guys keep repeating the same silly canards over and over again, and he has to expend such an exhaustive amount of time defending himself over silly things that the Comicle brings up every other day, like sprinklers? Nah, that couldn’t be it. Joe Garofoli and his ilk act like they want the Archbishop to speak more, yet they spend ninety percent of their time trying to muzzle him with ridiculous accusations along the lines of the Archbishop being the evil groundskeeper who lives to drench homeless people.

That might change this fall, his backers say.

“We need to get him in the front more,” Melgarejo said. “Soon, you may see it.”

That really depends entirely on you and you ilk, Mr. Garofoli. You can let the Archbishop work with his staff in peace, or you can keep up with your useless attempts to see him ditch Church teachings for YOUR social doctrine. It’s up to you.

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5 thoughts on “Screed of the Week

  1. Funny they and Rolling stone NEVER mention Francis like AB Cordileone denunciation of Gender apostasy Theory, support for Kim Davis Conscience clause on Not signing Deviant so called SSM papers or UN speech calling for support for pre birth fetuses as well as children etc..

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks so much for a real Bishop – Robert McElroy – who you dissed for pointing out the obvious theo-misogyny driving Cordileone, Illo and their fan club.

    And the answer to your question; clearly crazy, and statistically, no one cares.

    Like

    1. So, in other words, you think the whole Catholic Church is misogynistic, right? If not, please show where Fr. Illo and Archbishop Cordileone differ from, say, the Holy Father.

      I will tell you, I’ve always got to laugh when I hear a man claim other men are misogynistic. Personally, I don’t need YOU to do battle for ME. That’s kind of where the real misogyny lies. Men trying to tell me that girls need to be serving on the altar to have worth in the Church. Pul-eez. I don’t need to do a man’s job to have worth. It’s quite sad what some are teaching our girls. I’ve got some great, beautiful, young women in my family (daughters, nieces, in-laws) and they are not whining that they can’t do what their brothers/fathers do. They are trailblazers in their own way. Maybe that’s why they’re stlll practicing Catholics. Nobody told them the Church is trying to keep them down and, essentially, inducing sibling rivalry. They know they have an important role to play.

      Which question are you attempting to answer? So many. Statistically, no one cares? About what? it certainly isn’t the Archbishop. He’s getting more ink than any other bishop right this second. Huge fascination with him.

      Like

  3. Why isn’t Archbishop Cordileone like Pope Francis? Because in his words and deeds (I can’t judge the heart of either), the Archbishop is Catholic, and the Pope isn’t.

    Like

    1. Over the top. Pope Francis has not said a single thing to contradict Catholic doctrine in word or deed and the Archbishop would be the first person to agree with me on that. I realize people are frustrated the Holy Father didn’t spell every letter of doctrine out when he was here but to say he’s not Catholic in word or deed would be incorrect to the hilt. We cannot let frustration push us into insanity.

      Like

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